LAYOUT PHOTOS

1. After a site for a new cattle handling system has been chosen and a plan drawn, make a full-scale layout of the facility on the ground. This layout is important to show to scale the location of pens, alleys, loading chutes, and the handling area where the squeeze chute is. This outline allows you to walk through and see the new layout and make sure your design is correct before construction begins. Using stakes and heavy string for layout lines, establish the layout line according to the site measurements determined in the planning phase. This line serves as a reference point for laying out the entire facility. Radius points along the layout line determine the location of the single-file chute, crowd pen, and wide curved lanes, which are formed from three half circles. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
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1. After a site for a new cattle handling system has been chosen and a plan drawn, make a full-scale layout of the facility on the ground. This layout is important to show to scale the location of pens, alleys, loading chutes, and the handling area where the squeeze chute is. This outline allows you to walk through and see the new layout and make sure your design is correct before construction begins. Using stakes and heavy string for layout lines, establish the layout line according to the site measurements determined in the planning phase. This line serves as a reference point for laying out the entire facility. Radius points along the layout line determine the location of the single-file chute, crowd pen, and wide curved lanes, which are formed from three half circles. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
2. Locate the center point for the 12-foot (3.6m) crowd pen along the layout line and drive a stake into the ground at that point.  Tie heavy duty string to the stake and mark the string with a black marker exactly 12-feet (3.6m) from the stake. Hold the end of the string where you marked it and slowly walk around the 180-degree half circle of the crowd pen. Have a helper follow behind and lay down a chalk line in the path of the 12-foot (3.6m) mark on the string as it sweeps around. Drive a stake for the 16-foot (4.8m) inside radius of the single-file chute along the layout line and make the chalk line for the 180-degree half circle of the single-file chute. The 12-foot (3.6m) radius of the round crowd pen and the 16-foot (4.8m) radius of the single-file chute are dimensions that should never be changed. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
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1. After a site for a new cattle handling system has been chosen and a plan drawn, make a full-scale layout of the facility on the ground. This layout is important to show to scale the location of pens, alleys, loading chutes, and the handling area where the squeeze chute is. This outline allows you to walk through and see the new layout and make sure your design is correct before construction begins. Using stakes and heavy string for layout lines, establish the layout line according to the sire measurements determined in the planning phase. This line serves as a reference point for laying out the entire facility. Radius points along the layout line determine the location of the single-file chute, crowd pen, and wide curved lanes, which are formed from three half circles. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
2. Locate the center point for the 12-foot (3.6m) crowd pen along the layout line and drive a stake into the ground at that point. Tie heavy duty string to the stake and mark the string with a black marker exactly 12-feet (3.6m) from the stake. Hold the end of the string where you marked it and slowly walk around the 180-degree half circle of the crowd pen. Have a helper follow behind and lay down a chalk line in the path of the 12-foot (3.6m) mark on the string as it sweeps around. Drive a stake for the 16-foot (4.8m) inside radius of the single-file chute along the layout line and make the chalk line for the 180-degree half circle of the single-file chute. The 12-foot (3.6m) radius of the round crowd pen and the 16-foot (4.8m) radius of the single-file chute are dimensions that should never be changed. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
3. All the posts in the curved cattle handling system are spaced on 4-foot (1.2m) apart. The posts that form the single-file chute are spaced 4-foot (1.2m) apart on the outside radius of the single-file chute. The layout of these posts can be marked with large nails and plastic flagging, and by using the strings as a guide resembles spokes on a bicycle wheel. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com3
1. After a site for a new cattle handling system has been chosen and a plan drawn, make a full-scale layout of the facility on the ground. This layout is important to show to scale the location of pens, alleys, loading chutes, and the handling area where the squeeze chute is. This outline allows you to walk through and see the new layout and make sure your design is correct before construction begins. Using stakes and heavy string for layout lines, establish the layout line according to the sire measurements determined in the planning phase. This line serves as a reference point for laying out the entire facility. Radius points along the layout line determine the location of the single-file chute, crowd pen, and wide curved lanes, which are formed from three half circles. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
3. All the posts in the curved cattle handling system are spaced on spaced 4-foot (1.2m) on center apart. The posts that form the single-file chute are spaced 4-feet (1.2m) apart on the outside radius of the single-file chute. The layout of these posts can be marked with large nails and plastic flagging, and by using the strings as a guide resembles spokes on a bicycle wheel. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
4. Hands-on layout. Tie a 16-foot (4.8m) string to the stake located on the layout line and use it as a compass to lay out a 180-degree half-circle to form the inside radius of the curved single-file chute. Measure and mark the string again at 18-feet 10-inches (5.4m 25cm). This mark is for the outside radius of the chute. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
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1. After a site for a new cattle handling system has been chosen and a plan drawn, make a full-scale layout of the facility on the ground. This layout is important to show to scale the location of pens, alleys, loading chutes, and the handling area where the squeeze chute is. This outline allows you to walk through and see the new layout and make sure your design is correct before construction begins. Using stakes and heavy string for layout lines, establish the layout line according to the sire measurements determined in the planning phase. This line serves as a reference point for laying out the entire facility. Radius points along the layout line determine the location of the single-file chute, crowd pen, and wide curved lanes, which are formed from three half circles. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
5. Check the layout for accuracy. Walk through the chalk-drawn facility with the drafted design in your hand to make sure your design on the ground matches the drawing on paper. Carefully check the critical junction between the single-file chute and the crowd pen. It must look exactly like the drawings on this page. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
5. Check the layout for accuracy. Walk through the chalk-drawn facility with the drafted design in your hand to make sure your design on the ground matches the drawing on paper. Carefully check the critical junction between the single-file chute and the crowd pen. It must look exactly like the drawings on this page. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
6. As you walk through the layout, you can look to see what animals will be seeing as they move through the facility. Considering the animal?s perspective, ask yourself the following questions: Are the animals facing the sun as they move toward the handling area? Are there distractions such as traffic up ahead? Are they moving uphill or downhill as they travel through the pens and alleys in any direction? Which direction are the animals moving as they exit the squeeze chute? At this point if you see any problems, the layout can be changed. Make any changes on the drawing first. Changes made on the ground layout sometime result in further problems because you cannot see the entire layout while standing on the ground. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
6. As you walk through the layout, you can look to see what animals will be seeing as they move through the facility. Considering the animal?s perspective, ask yourself the following questions: Are the animals facing the sun as they move toward the handling area? Are there distractions such as traffic up ahead? Are they moving uphill or downhill as they travel through the pens and alleys in any direction? Which direction are the animals moving as they exit the squeeze chute? At this point if you see any problems, the layout can be changed. Make any changes on the drawing first. Changes made on the ground layout sometime result in further problems because you cannot see the entire layout while standing on the ground. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
4. Hands-on layout. Tie a 16-foot (4.8m) string to the stake located on the layout line and use it as a compass to lay out a 180-degree circle to form the inside radius of the curved single-file chute. Measure and mark the string again at 18-feet 10-inches (5.4m 25cm). This mark is for the outside radius of the chute. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
5. Check the layout for accuracy. Walk through the chalk-drawn facility with the drafted design in your hand to make sure your design on the ground matches the drawing on paper. Carefully check the critical junction between the single-file chute and the crowd pen. It must look exactly like the drawing. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
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1. After a site for a new cattle handling system has been chosen and a plan drawn, make a full-scale layout of the facility on the ground. This layout is important to show to scale the location of pens, alleys, loading chutes, and the handling area where the squeeze chute is. This outline allows you to walk through and see the new layout and make sure your design is correct before construction begins. Using stakes and heavy string for layout lines, establish the layout line according to the sire measurements determined in the planning phase. This line serves as a reference point for laying out the entire facility. Radius points along the layout line determine the location of the single-file chute, crowd pen, and wide curved lanes, which are formed from three half circles. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
5. Check the layout for accuracy. Walk through the chalk-drawn facility with the drafted design in your hand to make sure your design on the ground matches the drawing on paper. Carefully check the critical junction between the single-file chute and the crowd pen. It must look exactly like the drawing. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
6. As you walk through the layout, you can look to see what animals will be seeing as they move through the facility. Considering the animal's perspective, ask yourself the following questions: Are the animals facing the sun as they move toward the handling area? Are there distractions such as traffic up ahead? Are they moving uphill or downhill as they travel through the pens and alleys in any direction? Which direction are the animals moving as they exit the squeeze chute? At this point if you see any problems, the layout can be changed. Make any changes on the drawing first. Changes made on the ground layout sometime result in further problems because you cannot see the entire layout while standing on the ground. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com6
1. After a site for a new cattle handling system has been chosen and a plan drawn, make a full-scale layout of the facility on the ground. This layout is important to show to scale the location of pens, alleys, loading chutes, and the handling area where the squeeze chute is. This outline allows you to walk through and see the new layout and make sure your design is correct before construction begins. Using stakes and heavy string for layout lines, establish the layout line according to the sire measurements determined in the planning phase. This line serves as a reference point for laying out the entire facility. Radius points along the layout line determine the location of the single-file chute, crowd pen, and wide curved lanes, which are formed from three half circles. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
6. As you walk through the layout, you can look to see what animals will be seeing as they move through the facility. Considering the animal's perspective, ask yourself the following questions: Are the animals facing the sun as they move toward the handling area? Are there distractions such as traffic up ahead? Are they moving uphill or downhill as they travel through the pens and alleys in any direction? Which direction are the animals moving as they exit the squeeze chute? At this point if you see any problems, the layout can be changed. Make any changes on the drawing first. Changes made on the ground layout sometime result in further problems because you cannot see the entire layout while standing on the ground. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
7. Chalk line for the single-file chute ends on the layout line.www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com7
1. After a site for a new cattle handling system has been chosen and a plan drawn, make a full-scale layout of the facility on the ground. This layout is important to show to scale the location of pens, alleys, loading chutes, and the handling area where the squeeze chute is. This outline allows you to walk through and see the new layout and make sure your design is correct before construction begins. Using stakes and heavy string for layout lines, establish the layout line according to the sire measurements determined in the planning phase. This line serves as a reference point for laying out the entire facility. Radius points along the layout line determine the location of the single-file chute, crowd pen, and wide curved lanes, which are formed from three half circles. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
7. Chalk line for the single-file chute ends on the layout line. www.grandinlivestockhandlingsystems.com
     




LAYOUT DRAWINGS

This design features a single squeeze chute system and a curved, single-file calf chute. The wide curved lane in this system serves two functions. It directs animals to the squeeze chute and loading ramp, or it can be used as a reservoir for sorting cattle back into the diagonal pens. To do this, the curved lane is filled half-full of animals and a person either on foot or on horseback sorts them back toward the diagonal pens. The system also has a two way sort in front of the squeeze chute. All the fencing in the crowd pen, and the single-file chute are solid. All gates in crowding pen are solid.

This medium-sized feedlot corral is very popular and can be used in both large and small feedlots. It has a three-way sorting option in front of the squeeze chute, the curved lane has a smaller radius, and the entire facility doesn’t take up quite as much space as our larger feedlot layouts. Layout plan consists of three half-circles along the layout line: 16-foot (5m) radius V-chute; 12-foot (3.6m) radius crowd pen, and 16-foot (5m) radius wide curved lane.

This small curved handling system has a five-way sort in front of the squeeze chute. The drawing shows three different options for the orientation of the truck loading ramp. A 20-foot to 40-foot (6 to 12m) straight section is for electronics, scales, ultrasound stations, or other livestock processing equipment.

All fencing on the crowding pen, wide curved lane, and loading chute is solid. All gates in the crowding pen are solid.

This design shows a cross section of the V-chute with a one-way gate. The V-chute’s inside width at the top must be a minimum of 32-inches (81cm) wide and 16-inches (41cm) or more at the bottom. These measurements are critical. For cows that weigh more than 1,000 lbs (455kg), widen the bottom of the chute to 18-inches (46cm). If a 6-foot (1.8m) V-chute fence is needed for wild cattle, maintain a width of 32-inches (81cm) at the 5-foot (1.5m) height. If cows weigh more than 1,500 lbs (682kg), widen to 36-inches (91cm) at the 5-foot (1.5m) height.
 

Use 5-feet (1.5m) X 10-feet (3m) 10-gauge steel sheets for solid sides. The outside radius posts are 2-inches (609cm) higher than the inside radius to allow for a 2-inch (609) washout gap at the bottom of the chute. Overlap the steel sheets in the direction of cattle movement. For deep-groove concrete in V-chute, use 8-inch (203) diamond pattern grooves 1 ½-(38cm) wide, 1 ½ (38cm) deep. Broom finish concrete on raised platform and curb and gutter.
 
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